Friday, 20 May 2016

Tough Mudder Midlands is a matter of hours away and I’m packing up my HG hero, Steve and HG survivor, 14 month old Sienna and we’re heading for Belvoir Castle to tackle what they say is ‘probably the toughest event on the planet’, to raise money for the amazing charity Pregnancy Sickness Support.

Today the route was released. A 12 mile mud run punctuated with obstacles named according to their 25 different shades of sadism. It kicks off with Skid Marks and Sewer Rat, and after scaling and abseiling fences and climbing over hay bales, crawling through a dark tunnel of muddy water, and wading across a swamp, I’ll look *a lot less* sexy than any characters E L James could dream up. This is definitely not Fifty Shades of Grey; there’s no safe word, no ‘out’. After those five obstacles there’s another 20 to conquer… And my team mate, fellow PSS volunteer Beci (see previous post) has my permission to push me over any precipice on the course that might stop me in my tracks. I’ve trained too hard not to feel well ready for all of the challenges the course throws at me. Although I’m guessing that the 10 tonnes of ice they load Arctic Enema with won’t be the biggest turn on… or maybe Electroshock Therapy.

Aside from having trained hard, my mindset is this: I love being fit enough to take on a Tough Mudder. It’s just 14 months since I limped away from pregnancy-long hyperemesis gravidarum and the early delivery of my tiny baby. I spent long, lonely months trapped at home by extreme pregnancy sickness, fantasising about being able to feel the buzz of getting my heart rate up rather than how I was going to keep a cocktail of anti-sickness drugs down; to leap into water rather than struggle to wash my hair or brush my teeth in it because its smell(?!) made me gag. And to make Steve proud of me after all those months of picking up the pieces of me.

This event comes a week after international HG awareness day and the Pregnancy Sickness Support charity’s annual conference. The experiences that flooded my social media feeds and that were shared first hand by former HG sufferers are still ringing in my ears – there’s so much heart breaking loss surrounding HG pregnancies; from the loss of the long hoped-for glow of pregnancy, loss of dignity at incessant puking and peeing and being unable to care for yourself, to the tragic losses from ‘therapeutic’ termination, prematurity and stillbirth. The PSS charity is working very hard to support women and families enduring this and to improve the support and treatment they receive in the UK. Every penny that people sponsor me is supporting the charity to alleviate some of this hardship.

If you would like to sponsor me, my fundraising page is here. Thank you.